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Campus Messages

An archive of email messages sent to the entire UCSF community by the Chancellor and members of the Chancellor's Cabinet.

January 28, 2015
Leadership

Dear Colleagues,

I am very pleased to announce that UC President Janet Napolitano has approved the appointment of Dan Lowenstein, MD, as the next executive vice chancellor and provost at UCSF.

Dan will collaborate with other members of my leadership team and me to develop and implement campus priorities across our mission areas of research, education, and patient care.

An internationally renowned UCSF physician-scientist specializing in epilepsy research and an award-winning medical educator, Dan is a champion on issues related to cultural diversity and civil rights. He exemplifies excellence in all aspects of our mission and has a deep commitment to our community and its success. His principles align closely with those of UCSF, and I am very glad to have him join me in leading this great University.

Dan succeeds Jeffrey A. Bluestone, PhD, who has done a superb job of guiding and setting priorities within the research and academic enterprise, including developing a visionary precision medicine platform. Jeff has made significant contributions toward the advancement of a broad and innovative approach to advance the translation of UCSF discoveries into public benefit, and I am deeply grateful to him for his leadership.

You can read more about this appointment at: http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2015/01/122921/driven-science-humanism-and-service-dan-lowenstein-joins-ucsf-leadership-team. Please join me in congratulating Dan in his new role.

Sincerely,
Sam Hawgood, MBBS
Chancellor
Arthur and Toni Rembe Rock...

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January 15, 2015
Community

Dear Colleagues,

Last month our medical students started a national movement called #whitecoats4blacklives in response to events in Ferguson, Missouri, and New York City. They were able to connect with students across the country to bring attention to issues of race in medicine and health care disparities among underserved populations. More than 80 schools and thousands of students, faculty, trainees, and staff participated in December’s white coat “die-in.”

Their courage in standing up for social justice has resonated throughout UCSF. The most profound example is the School of Medicine’s decision to change the topic of its leadership retreat to issues of race and racism in higher education and in health care. At times it was an uncomfortable conversation, but it was an important discussion to have.

As we look forward to “life after the die-in,” we want to continue the momentum started by our students and focus on making UCSF an even more inclusive place. While we may have a long way to go, we have some great minds working on tangible solutions. We’ll tell you more as initiatives are finalized, but I want to leave you with this article that describes how we have responded to our students’ concerns so far and some of the things in progress.

I urge you to read the story at: http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2015/01/122666/life-after-‘die-in’ and strengthen our commitment to diversity.

Sincerely,

Sam Hawgood, MBBS
Chancellor
Arthur and Toni Rembe Rock Distinguished Professor

January 14, 2015
Leadership

Dear Colleagues,

We are excited to announce that we have successfully recruited Atul Butte, MD, PhD, a world-famous leader in medical technology. Atul will lead a new UCSF Institute for Computational Health Sciences. This institute will be key in mining the flow of health data to find effective cures faster and help fulfill the promise of precision medicine.

A renowned expert in pediatrics and medical informatics at Stanford University, Atul brings with him a rare combination of deep knowledge in medicine and biomedical research and in technological fluency. He will join us on April 1, 2015. We are delighted to welcome Atul to UCSF.

Please read details in this press release.

Sincerely,

Sam Hawgood, MBBS
Chancellor, Arthur and Toni Rembe Rock Distinguished Professor

Bruce Wintroub, MD
Interim Dean, School of Medicine